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House Judiciary Hears Hawaiian Homes Casino Bill

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   February 9th, 2010 · 2 Disqus Comments · Maui News

The House Judiciary Committee this afternoon will hear bills relating to the legalization of gaming in Hawaii.  The bill was introduced by Rep. Mele Carroll of Maui.  HB2759 seeks establishment of casino gaming operations on designated Hawaiian Home Lands parcels.

File photo courtesy Office of Mele Carroll.

File photo courtesy Office of Mele Carroll.

The measure would impose a wagering tax on gross receipts with 20% going towards the State’s general fund and 80% going toward the Hawaiian Home Lands trust.  Carroll introduced the bill in part to provide a mechanism in which DHHL could generate funds independently and diminish its reliance on the state.

DHHL currently earns about $16 to $17 million dollars in commercial lease properties and gets  $30 million appropriated annual through the legislature because of a prior lawsuit, with the allocation due to expire in 2015.

DHHL officials say approximately 25,000 applicants for Hawaiian Home Lands have been waitlisted and the department is only able to process between 500 and 1,000 applications per year with current funding.

In a media release issued last week, Representative Mele Carroll said, “I’m introducing this bill not as a commercial enterprise, but as a mechanism that would allow DHHL to decide whether they want to consider gaming as a way to put more people onto Hawaiian Home Lands and to better fund their infrastructural and social programs.”

In addition to generating funding for DHHL and its beneficiaries, this bill is also aimed at invigorating Hawai`i’s economy by creating jobs for those in the construction and entertainment sectors as well as boosting hotel occupancy.

Archived Story from 2/5/2010:  Hawaiian Homelands Casino Bill Introduced by Mele Carroll of Maui

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  • Pia aluli

    A letter I wrote to Mele Carol. If I have offended anyone my apoligies.

    Aloha Mele,

    I would like to respond to your idea about introducing a bill that, if passed, would give the Hawaiian Homes Commission the right to build and operate gaming facilities on Hawaiian Home Lands. Your idea is shortsighted and so detrimental to Native Hawaiians and well as the state of Hawaii. You have to know that it is mostly people who need the money and can’t afford to, will try to grab the golden ring. They will spend their last dollar in the hopes of winning thus putting the welfare and support of their family deeper in debt. You will be offering them a dream in which few win with so many being the looser. For what? The pain and suffering incurred far outweighs the upside. Honest work for monetary security is the only answer. Gambling is a sleazy and shortsighted answer!

    You are cherry picking your justification to allow gambling. I have seen reports and studies conducted which conclude very few within the native Tribe benefit with gambling on Native American lands. l have many friends who are Native Americans and they have warned against gambling. They tell me, allowing gambling has done more damage than good and is wrong for their people. Gambling tempts people to put hard earned money on the hopes of a monetary windfall, causes more dysfunction within the tribe and pits families against each other.

    Mele please work for the betterment of the Hawaiian people and less on politics. Your idea is short-sighted and discourteous. I am aware of the pressure of not having an income and security but the hope of achieving this through chance is the wrong road to go down. Definition of gamble says it all!

    Malama Pono

    Gam-ble-

    • to stake or risk money, or anything of value, on the outcome of something involving chance.

    • to lose or squander by betting

  • Pia aluli

    A letter I wrote to Mele Carol. If I have offended anyone I apologize.

    Aloha Mele,

    I would like to respond to your idea about introducing a bill that, if passed, would give the Hawaiian Homes Commission the right to build and operate gaming facilities on Hawaiian Home Lands. Your idea is shortsighted and so detrimental to Native Hawaiians and well as the state of Hawaii. You have to know that it is mostly people who need the money and can’t afford to, will try to grab the golden ring. They will spend their last dollar in the hopes of winning thus putting the welfare and support of their family deeper in debt. You will be offering them a dream in which few win with so many being the looser. For what? The pain and suffering incurred far outweighs the upside. Honest work for monetary security is the only answer. Gambling is a sleazy and shortsighted answer!

    You are cherry picking your justification to allow gambling. I have seen reports and studies conducted which conclude very few within the native Tribe benefit with gambling on Native American lands. l have many friends who are Native Americans and they have warned against gambling. They tell me, allowing gambling has done more damage than good and is wrong for their people. Gambling tempts people to put hard earned money on the hopes of a monetary windfall, causes more dysfunction within the tribe and pits families against each other.

    Mele please work for the betterment of the Hawaiian people and less on politics. Your idea is short-sighted and discourteous. I am aware of the pressure of not having an income and security but the hope of achieving this through chance is the wrong road to go down. Definition of gamble says it all!

    Malama Pono

    Gam-ble-

    • to stake or risk money, or anything of value, on the outcome of something involving chance.

    • to lose or squander by betting