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Another Burst in Volcanic Ash Prompts Ashfall Advisory

May 15, 2018, 8:33 AM HST · Updated May 15, 10:57 AM
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Panorama of Kīlauea Caldera from HVO Observation Tower [KIcam]. Updated 2018-05-15 8:10 a.m. (HST). This image is from a research camera mounted in the observation tower at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. The camera is looking SSE towards the active vent in Halemaʻumaʻu, 1.9 km (1.2 miles) from the webcam. For scale, Halemaʻumaʻu is approximately 1 km (0.6 mi) across and about 85 m (~280 ft) deep. PC: US Geological Survey

Another burst in volcanic ash emissions from the Haleamaʻumaʻu Crater on Hawaiʻi Island was recorded at 7 a.m. on Tuesday, May 15, 2018, prompting a special weather statement advising area residents of light ashfall and hazardous air quality.

At 10 a.m., the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reported rock falls and gas explosions within Halemaʻumaʻu Crater have caused an ash plume which is carrying ash downstream across the Kaʻū District. Ash is being reported along Highway 11 in Pahala.

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The National Weather Service says northeast winds will carry ash downstream across the Big Island’s Kaʻū District affecting the Punaluʻu, Wood Valley and Naʻalehu communities this morning and  into early afternoon.

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anorama of Halemaʻumaʻu Overlook Vent from HVO Observation Tower [K2cam]
Last Updated 2018-05-15 09:14:04 (HST). PC: US Geological Survey.

The public in affected areas is advised to avoid excessive exposure to ash, which is an eye and respiratory irritant. Those with respiratory sensitivities should take extra precaution to minimize exposure.

The latest ash burst was documented via web camera at the Kīlauea Volcano Summit.  A similar event on Monday morning, prompted similar advisories.

Panorama of Puʻu ʻŌʻō Crater Single Frame from the North Rim [POcam] Last Updated 2018-05-15 09:22:08 (HST). This image is from a temporary research camera positioned on the north rim of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, looking into the crater. The current crater is about 250 m (~275 yds) across. PC: US Geological Survey.

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