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ʻOheʻo Stream Closed Due to High Water, Damaged Equipment

ʻOheʻo Gulch in East Maui region of Kīpahulu. Photo courtesy Haleakalā National Park. [1]

File photo showing what flash flood conditions look like at ʻOheʻo, courtesy Haleakalā National Park. Park officials say although the stream may appear calm at sea level, flooding may be imminent due to heavy upland rainfall.

By Maui Now Staff

The ʻOheʻo Stream, located along the Pīpīwai Trail in East Maui remains closed due to high water and damaged stream monitoring equipment, park officials announced.

The stream has been closed for a week due to recent storm conditions and continued flooding, which prohibit Haleakalā National Park staff from safely accessing the upstream sensors, the announcement said.

“We appreciate everyone’s continued patience during this ongoing safety concern,” said park Superintendent Natalie Gates in a statement today.

According to park policy, the stream is closed as a safety precaution when flash flooding occurs, or if the monitoring system becomes non-functional and flood levels cannot be determined, authorities said.

ʻOheʻo Gulch in East Maui region of Kīpahulu. Photo courtesy Haleakalā National Park. [2]

File photo showing what flash flood conditions look like at ʻOheʻo, courtesy Haleakalā National Park. Park officials say although the stream may appear calm at sea level, flooding may be imminent due to heavy upland rainfall.

The sensors, located along several miles of the Palikea and ʻOheʻo Streams, track water levels and rainfall.

According to Polly Angelakis, chief of interpretation and education at the park, the sensors will sound an alarm in the Kīpahulu Visitor Center when flash flood conditions are possible.

“The triggering of the alarm signals heightened flood potential and results in closing of the pools to visitors,” according to park officials.

Visitors are advised and reminded to abide by posted closure signs along the stream, and are asked to follow the direction and instruction of park staff.

“Although the stream may appear calm at sea level, flooding may be imminent due to heavy upland rainfall,” said Gates.

Park officials say injuries and fatalities have resulted in the past from visitors entering closed areas.

ʻOheʻo Gulch in East Maui region of Kīpahulu. File photo by Wendy Osher. [3]

ʻOheʻo Gulch in East Maui region of Kīpahulu. File photo by Wendy Osher.

ʻOheʻo Gulch in East Maui region of Kīpahulu. File photo by Wendy Osher. [4]

ʻOheʻo Gulch in East Maui region of Kīpahulu. File photo by Wendy Osher.

ʻOheʻo Gulch in East Maui region of Kīpahulu. Photo courtesy Haleakalā National Park. [5]

File photo showing what flash flood conditions look like at ʻOheʻo, courtesy Haleakalā National Park. Park officials say although the stream may appear calm at sea level, flooding may be imminent due to heavy upland rainfall.