Maui Arts & Entertainment

2015 Miss Aloha Hula Results: Maui’s Tanigawa Earns Top 5 Finish

April 10, 2015, 7:26 AM HST
* Updated April 11, 1:37 PM
A
A
A

Jasmine Kaleihiwa Dunlap of Hula Hālau 'O Kamuela, under the direction of Kumu Kau'ionalani Kamana'o and Kunewa Mook dances to "Hōpoe." Screenshot from televised broadcast credit: KFVE/Merrie Monarch Hula Festival.

Jasmine Kaleihiwa Dunlap of Hula Hālau ‘O Kamuela, under the direction of Kumu Kau’ionalani Kamana’o and Kunewa Mook dances to “Hōpoe.” Screenshot from televised broadcast credit: KFVE/Merrie Monarch Hula Festival.

By Wendy Osher

The hula community crowned the 2015 Miss Aloha Hula during the first night of competition at the 52nd Annual Merrie Monarch Hula Festival in Hilo, Hawaiʻi last night.

Jasmine Kaleihiwa Dunlap of Hula Hālau ʻO Kamuela under the direction of nā kumu hula Kauʻionālani Kamanaʻo and Kunewa Mook, took the title after honoring Hiʻiaka, the youngest sister of Pele, in both her kahiko and ʻauana performances.

Dunlap’s kahiko performance, to “He Kau No Hiʻiakaikapoliopele,” praised Hiʻiaka, who returns from Kauaʻi with Lohiʻau at her sisters request, only to find her beloved lehua grove ravaged by Pele’s jealousy.  In her ʻauana, Dunlap danced to “Hōpoe,” a hula that also speaks of Hiʻiaka’s travels and the broken promise of Pele, who destroys her favorite lehua groves.

Merrie Monarch, file photo by Wendy Osher.

Merrie Monarch, file photo by Wendy Osher.

Dunlap wore red in both appearances, and was graced in yellow and red lehua blossoms to accent her hair and neck in her ʻauana performance.

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW AD

Dunlap also won the OHA Hawaiian Language award for her mastery and use of the language.

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW AD

Second place went to Abby Claire Haliʻahauola Resulta of Hālau Hiʻiakaināmakalehua, under the direction of Robert Keʻano Kaʻupu and Lono Padilla.

Maui’s own ʻĀnela Uʻilani Ruth Fusano Tanigawa finished in the top five. She is a student of kumu hula Nāpua Greig and dances for Hālau Nā Lei Kaumaka O Uka.

Tanigawa performed her kahiko to “Nanimauloa,” that is described as a “counter-narrative” to other mele that focus on the tragic end to the kingdom.  According to festival literature, it is “one part of a handful of poetic mele chosen to depict the different facets of life of our people during a time of political strife.”

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW AD

In her ʻauana selection, Tanigawa danced to John Almeida’s “Ke Aloha O Kāua,” a love song, described as a “poetic delight,” that explored the “different emotions and thrills of love.”

2015 Miss Aloha Hula Results:

The points awarded to each dancer were announced during the awards presentation and included the following:

Other Maui soloists competing in last night’s event were: Kelsey Marie Kuʻulei Miliama Haina Galago who dances for Hālau Kekuaokalāʻauʻalaʻiliahi, under the direction of nā kumu hula ʻIliahi & Haunani Paredes; and Larriley Kehaulani Kaleonahe Kekahuna Rawlins from Moanaʻs Hula Hālau on Molokaʻi, under the direction of nā kumu hula Raquel Dudoit and Valerie Dudoit-Temahaga.

Tonight’s Kahiko Lineup, Maui Highlights:

The competition continues with group kahiko or ancient hula tonight.  Tonight’s lineup includes the following Maui highlights:

  • Moana’s Hula Hālau from Kaunakakai, Molokaʻi will perform third in tonight’s lineup to the mele, “Maikaʻi Nani Ka ʻŌiwi O Ka Pali,” which commemorates the travels of Queen Emma.  According to festival material, the mele goes on a journey to the northeast end of Molokaʻi and speaks of the Hoʻolua winds and steep cliffs of Kahiwa.
  • The women of Hālau Kekuaokalāʻauʻalaʻiliahi, under the direction of nā kumu hula ʻIliahi & Haunani Paredes will take the stage as number seven in tonight’s lineup, dancing to “Ka ʻOi O Nā Pua,” a mele composed in honor of Queen Liliʻuokalani, the last reigning monarch of the Kingdom of Hawaiʻi.
  • The men of Hālau Kekuaokalāʻauʻalaʻiliahi, under the direction of nā kumu hula ʻIliahi & Haunani Paredes will perform 14th, just before intermission to “Aia Ka Laʻi I Kaʻuiki.”  The mele speaks of the calm that resides at Kaʻuiki Hill in the East Maui town of Hāna, and the Lilinoe mist, according to festival material.
  • The women of Hālau Nā Lei Kaumaka O Uka under the direction of kumu hula Nāpua Greig takes the stage toward the end of the night, performing 26th in a lineup that includes 28 groups.  They will dance to “Manono,” a mele that commemorates Manono, the wife of Kekuaokalani.  The two are credited with defending their religious beliefs in the kapu system to defend their way of life, according to festival literature.

The festival will continue with group ʻauna or modern hula on Saturday night, followed by an awards ceremony.  For those who could not make it to Hilo this year, the event is being carried live via televised coverage on KFVE and live streaming.

E-Mail Newsletters Receive daily or weekly updates via e-mail. Subscribe Now
News Alerts Breaking news alerts on your mobile device. Get the App

Comments

This comments section is a public community forum for the purpose of free expression. Although Maui Now encourages respectful communication only, some content may be considered offensive. Please view at your own discretion. View Comments