Maui News

IMAGES: Solar Eclipse Slide Show from Maui

August 21, 2017, 9:27 AM HST
* Updated August 22, 8:41 AM
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Many across Maui paused to appreciate the partial view of the Total Solar Eclipse that is making its way across the US today.  Here’s a glimpse at some of the images captured from Maui.

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*If you have images from today’s eclipse or other news happening on Maui, send them to us at [email protected]

Hawaiʻi got a glimpse of the event before it became total with about one third of the sun’s disk blocked by the moon.  The event began at dawn around 6:20 a.m. and ended at around 7:25 a.m.

“As this eclipse ends at 7:25 HST on Aug. 21 in the islands, it will be getting underway on the North American continent as the shadow of the moon races across our planet. 7:25 a.m. HST is 12:25 p.m. Central Daylight Time in Nashville, for example, and at that time the partial eclipse will be underway in Nashville; the eclipse in Nashville goes total at 1:27 p.m. CDT on Aug. 21, which is 8:27 a.m. Hawaiʻi Time… ,” according to information compiled by the Bishop Museum’s J. Watumull Planetarium.

According to the J. Watumull Planetarium, a total solar eclipse occurs when the moon completely blocks the Sun which reveals the Sun’s outer atmosphere – the corona. This is considered a rare event for those in the US, and Planetarium staff note that those in Hawaiʻi will actually have to wait until 2106 to view a total solar eclipse in the islands.

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The last total solar eclipse visible in the continental US reportedly occurred in 1979, and the next one will not take place until 2024; but even that one will be viewed as a partial eclipse for most of North America.

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Monday’s event is being called “The Great American Eclipse,” because it will pass across the center of the continental US. Cities along the path of totality include: Salem, Oregon; Nashville Tennessee; and both Columbia and Charleston, South Carolina, according to the Planetarium.

Parts of Oregon will be the first to see the total eclipse starting at 10:16 a.m. PDT on Monday, Aug. 21, with the event to be in total form for just under two minutes. South Carolina will be the last area to view the event in its totality beginning at around 2:46 p.m. EDT.

View of today’s solar eclipse from Haleakalā, Maui this morning. PC: 8.21.17, Courtesy Matt O’Connor.

Eclipse from Washington 8.21.17. PC: by Maui resident Chris Archer.

Total eclipse view from Idaho. PC: 8.21.17 by Maui resident Asa Ellison

Solar Eclipse, Wailuku, Maui. PC: 8.21.17 by Ka’i Herrick

Solar eclipse view from Haleakalā, Maui. PC: 8.21.17 by Kathleen McFeeters

Solar eclipse from “Sand Piles Beach” in Waiehu, Maui. PC: 8.21.17 by Cora Martin.

Solar eclipse from “Sand Piles Beach” in Waiehu, Maui. PC: 8.21.17 by Cora Martin.

Panoramic view of today’s solar eclipse from Haleakalā, Maui this morning. PC: 8.21.17, Courtesy Matt O’Connor.

View of today’s solar eclipse from Haleakalā, Maui this morning. PC: 8.21.17, Courtesy Matt O’Connor.

View of today’s solar eclipse from Haleakalā, Maui this morning. PC: 8.21.17, Courtesy Matt O’Connor.

View of today’s solar eclipse from Haleakalā, Maui this morning. PC: 8.21.17, Courtesy Matt O’Connor.

View of today’s solar eclipse from Haleakalā, Maui this morning. PC: 8.21.17, Courtesy Matt O’Connor.

Solar eclipse view from Kahului at 7 a.m. 8.2.17. Maui Now image.

Total eclipse view from Idaho. PC: 8.21.17 by Maui resident Asa Ellison

Total eclipse view from Idaho. PC: 8.21.17 by Maui resident Asa Ellison

Total eclipse view from Idaho. PC: 8.21.17 by Maui resident Asa Ellison

Total eclipse view from Idaho. PC: 8.21.17 by Maui resident Asa Ellison

Solar eclipse view from Haleakalā, Maui. PC: 8.21.17 by Kathleen McFeeters

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