Crime Statistics

2000 Honda Civic Tops List of “Hot” Wheels in Hawai’i

August 3, 2011, 8:35 AM HST
* Updated August 3, 1:35 PM
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By Wendy Osher

Honda. Photo by Wendy Osher.

The 2000 Honda Civic is the most stolen car in Hawai’i according to the National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB).  The Hot Wheels report examines vehicle theft data submitted by law enforcement to the National Crime Information Center, and determines the vehicle make, model, and model year most reported stolen in 2010.

The 1994 Honda Accord and the 1991 Toyota Camry are number two and three on Hawaii’s list. The top 10 “hot wheels” list for Hawaii also includes the 2000 Dodge Caravan, 1995 Acura Integra, 2009 Jeep Wrangler, 1999 Toyota Corolla, 2001 Dodge Dakota, 2004 Nissan Sentra, and 1995 Nissan Standard Body Pickup.

For a complete list of the most recent stolen vehicles on Maui, visit the Stolen Vehicles tab on the front page of MauiNow.com.

The NICB report also listed the most stolen vehicles in the nation in 2010.  The were:  (1) 1994 Honda Accord; (2) 1995 Honda Civic; (3) 1991 Toyota Camry; (4) 1999 Chevrolet Pickup (Full Size); (5) 1997 Ford F150 Series/Pickup; (6) 2004 Dodge Ram; (7) 2000 Dodge Caravan; (8) 1994 Acura Integra; (9) 2002 Ford Explorer; and (10) 1999 Ford Taurus.

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According to the report, the top three positions continue to be held by Honda and Toyota models, a consistent trend since 2000.

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Certain models of older cars and trucks are popular with thieves because of the value of their parts.  Other, newer, more expensive and insured models, the report states, are often stolen to be resold intact with counterfeit vehicle identification numbers, or shipped out of the country.

 

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