UPDATE: Entangled Subadult Humpback Whale Cut Free Off Maui

March 13, 2017, 6:55 AM HST · Updated March 13, 3:57 PM
Wendy Osher · 0 Comments
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    Update:

    On Sunday, March 12, 2017, an entangled subadult humpback whale was cut free by a team of trained responders off Maui.  The animal was entangled in large gauge electrical cable that was deeply embedded in the whale’s mouth. All gear except what could not be pulled from the whale’s mouth was successfully cut and removed.

    The response was part of a two-day effort by responders from the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, US Coast Guard, Maui Ocean Safety, Kahoʻolawe Island Reserve Commission, and the West Maui response team. The team of responders are authorized under NOAA’s National Marine Fisheries Service Marine Mammal Health and Stranding Response program (NOAA MMHSRP permit # 18786 and state PMAL-2016-212).

    The whale was first reported on Saturday, March 11 off the “Pali” lookout.  A response was mounted from the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary’s response vessel, Kohola, with assistance provided by a patrol boat from the US Coast Guard Station Maui.  Saturday’s assessment determined that the whale was entangled in gear exiting both sides of the mouth and heading straight down to the ocean floor.  Initial efforts to cut the gear were unsuccessful.

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    On Sunday, March 12, the animal was re-sighted in the same vicinity but headed south before letting the trailing gear settle on the ocean floor in about 60 feet of water off Kamaʻole Beach I.  While underway, several tour operators monitored the animal, including Ocean Odyssey (Pacific Whale Foundation), Quicksilver, Redline Rafting, Blue Water Rafting, and Maui Diamond II.

    Sunday’s assessments by the response team revealed that the gear was heavy-gauge (~ 5/8”) electrical cable.  The team used cable cutters to cut both cables leading to the whale’s mouth. It is estimated that around 500 feet of cable was removed from the animal with little gear remaining.  The cable had already embedded itself too deeply at the back of the whale’s mouth to pull out remaining gear.  However, this represents a significant improvement and the animal illustrated this in its movements and behaviors afterwards.  The source of the gear, which is a PVC-insulated electrical-type cable, is still unknown.

    Although the animal is slightly emaciated and has gear embedded at the back of the mouth, its overall present condition is good. With the removal of the gear, the chances of its survival have been greatly improved.

    Mariners are asked to keep a sharp lookout for this and other whales in distress, but not to approach closely or attempt to assist them. Only trained and well-equipped responders that are authorized under NOAA Fisheries’ Marine Mammal Health and Stranding Response Program are permitted to assist whales and other marine mammals.

    If you sight any marine mammal in distress, maintain 100 yards distance and please call the NOAA 24-hour hotline at 1-888 256-9840. If unable to call, please radio the U.S. Coast Guard on VHF CH. 16 and they will relay the report.

    It is illegal to approach a humpback whale closer than 100 yards by any means by sea and 1,000 feet by aircraft.

    Previous Post:

    Crews spent the weekend attempting to free an injured whale entangled in cable line off of Maui, sources tell Maui Now.

    On Sunday, witnesses observed the whale about a half-mile off of Kīhei in South Maui with response from both NOAA and the USCG.

    Bystanders say there was visible damage to the whale.  Observers were asked to stay back 1,000 yards to avoid upsetting the whale.

    The close of the 2016 whale season marks 14 years of whale rescue operations by the Hawaiian Islands Disentanglement Network, which was established in 2002.  As of 2015, the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary reported that the network had freed 22 large whales from life threatening entanglements, and removed more than 9,500 feet of large gauge line from the entangled whales.

    Crews respond to a distressed whale entangled in cable line off of Maui. 3.12.16. PC: Ellen Raimo

    Crews respond to a distressed whale entangled in cable line off of Maui. 3.12.16. PC: Ellen Raimo

    A NOAA member attempts to safely remove a large electrical cable from the mouth of a subadult humpback whale while off Maui March 11, 2017. The Coast Guard assisted responders from the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, Maui Ocean Safety, Kahoolawe Island Reserve Commission and NOAA’s West Maui response team by providing an additional platform work from and enforcing a safety zone in the area. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Rob Lester/Released)

    NOAA responders monitor a whale during attempts to remove a large electrical cable from the mouth of a subadult humpback whale while off Maui March 11, 2017. The Coast Guard assisted responders from the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, Maui Ocean Safety, Kahoolawe Island Reserve Commission and NOAA’s West Maui response team by providing an additional platform work from and enforcing a safety zone in the area. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Rob Lester/Released)

    A member of the Station Maui 45-foot Response Boat-Medium crew monitors whale disengagement operations off Maui’s McGregor Point March 11, 2017. The Coast Guard maintained a safety zone in the area as NOAA personnel attempted to remove a large electrical cable from the mouth of a subadult humpback whale. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Rob Lester/Released)

    Crews respond to a distressed whale entangled in cable line off of Maui. 3.12.16. PC: Ellen Raimo

    Crews respond to a distressed whale entangled in cable line off of Maui. 3.12.16. PC: Ellen Raimo

    Crews respond to a distressed whale entangled in cable line off of Maui. 3.12.16. PC: Ellen Raimo

    Wendy Osher
    Wendy Osher leads the Maui Now news team. She is also the news voice of parent company, Pacific Media Group, having served nearly 20 years as News Director for the company’s six Maui radio stations.

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