Fringes of Hurricane Hector to Brush Hawaii Island

August 7, 2018, 4:20 AM HST · Updated August 7, 8:08 PM
Wendy Osher · 0 Comments
×

no slideshow

Hector satellite imagery as of 8 p.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2018. PC: NOAA/CPHC

Update 8 p.m. 8.7.18 Update:

Forecasters with the Central Pacific Hurricane Center say the far northern fringes of Hurricane Hector will brush the Big Island on Wednesday. County authorities say tropical storm force winds up to 73 mph are possible for the east and southeast sections of Hawaiʻi Island, especially for the areas around South Point.

At 8 p.m. HST on Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2018, the center of Hurricane Hector was located 315 miles SE of Hilo, 405 miles SE of Hāna and 435 miles SE of Kahului, Maui (near latitude 16.6 North, longitude 151.6 West. ).

Hector has maintained its intensity as a Category 4 Hurricane with maximum sustained winds remaining near 130 mph with higher gusts. Some weakening is forecast during the next 48 hours.  According to the latest advisory, “Over the last few hours, the eye temperatures on IR imagery have been cooling, which may signal the beginning of the anticipated weakening trend.”

SPONSORED VIDEO

Hector is moving toward the west near 16 mph and this general motion is expected to continue through the next couple of days.

The center of Hector will pass 100 to 150 miles south of the Big Island during the day on Wednesday. Forecasters with the Central Pacific Hurricane Center say the effects of a hurricane are far reaching and can extend well away from the center. Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 40 miles from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 115 miles.

Tropical storm conditions are expected across portions of the Big Island on Wednesday as the core of Hector passes to the south. Forecasters say the strongest winds are expected downslope from mountains and across elevated terrain, over headlands, and through gaps.

The following beach and road closures are in effect:

  • Whittington, Punaluʻu, and Miloliʻi Beach Parks are closed. All pavilion and camping permits for these three parks have been cancelled through Friday.
  • South Point Road from the Kamaoa Road junction to South Point is open to local resident traffic only.
  • Early voting sites at the Pāhoa Community Center and the Pāhala Community Center will be closed Wednesday, Aug. 8.

According to the CPHC, a Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for Hawaiʻi County with tropical storm conditions expected somewhere within the warning area. According to the Central Pacific Hurricane Center’s Robert Ballard, Hector’s persistent slow trek toward higher latitudes now will bring the tropical storm force wind field associated with the hurricane close enough to the Big Island to necessitate issuing a tropical storm warning.”

On the water, swells generated by Hector are expected to reach southeast and east facing shores of the Big Island and eastern Maui late today. CPHC forecasters say these swells will likely become large and dangerous by late tonight and Wednesday.

    +
    SWIPE LEFT OR RIGHT

    Intermediate Update 2 p.m. 8.7.18 Update:

    Hurricane Hector remains a powerful system.  It continues on a march westward and is expected to pass south of the Big Island on Wednesday.

    At 2 p.m. HST on Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2018, the eye of Hurricane Hector was located 405 miles SE of Hilo, 495 miles SE of Hāna, and 525 miles SE of Kahului, Maui (near latitude 16.4 North, longitude 150.0 West).

    Hector picked up speed slightly and is now moving toward the west near 17 mph.

    The center of Hector is expected to pass less than 200 miles south of the Big Island on Wednesday; However, forecasters remind the public that the effects of a hurricane are far-reaching and can extend well away from the center. Forecasters with the CPHC say tropical storm conditions are possible across portions of Hawaiʻi County on Wednesday as the core of Hector passes south of the Big Island.

    Hurricane-force winds now extend outward up to 40 miles from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 115 miles.

    Hector has maintained its intensity as a Cetegory 4 Hurricane with maximum sustained winds near 130 mph, according to data compiled from Air Force Reserve Hurricane Hunters. Some weakening is forecast over the next couple of days.

    The estimated minimum central pressure is 952 mb (28.11 inches).

    On the water, swells generated by Hector are expected to reach southeast and east facing shores of the Big Island and eastern Maui late today, likely becoming large and dangerous by late tonight and Wednesday.

    The next full update will be at 5 p.m. HST.

    *Below is an 11 a.m. update with Maui Now Meteorologist Malika Dudley.

    Maui Weekend Weather Outlook: August 7, 2018

    #HurricaneHector Update with Meteorologist Malika DudleyHector Tuesday Updates: http://mauinow.com/?p=275332CPHC says “little to no impact expected” for Maui County. The center of Hurricane Hector was located 540 miles ESE of Hilo, 625 miles ESE of Hāna, Maui, and 655 miles ESE of Kahului. At 8 a.m. HST on Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2018, Hector had 130 mph sustained winds and is still expected to pass less than 200 miles south of the Big Island of Hawaiʻi on Wednesday.#MauiNowNews #Hector

    Posted by MauiNow.com on Tuesday, August 7, 2018

    Full 11 a.m. 8.7.18 Update:

    At 11 a.m. HST on Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2018, the eye of Hurricane Hector was located 455 miles ESE of Hilo, 540 miles SE of Hāna and 575 miles SE of Kahului, Maui. Air Force Reserve Hurricane Hunter aircraft tracked the system near latitude 16.4 North, longitude 149.1 West.

    According to the CPHC, the forecast track brings the center of Hector less than 200 miles south of the Big Island on Wednesday, and given the proximity of the storm to the island, the Tropical Storm Watch remains in effect.

    Forecasters remind the public that the effects of a hurricane are far-reaching and can extend well away from the center. Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 40 miles from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 115 miles.

    Hector is moving toward the west near 16 mph. This general motion is expected to continue through Thursday.

    Maximum sustained winds are near 130 mph with higher gusts, which means Hector has maintained its strength as a category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. Some weakening is forecast during the next 48 hours.

    The estimated minimum central pressure is 950 mb (28.06 inches).

    On the water, swells generated by Hector are expected to reach SE and E facing shores of the Big Island and eastern Maui late today, likely becoming large and dangerous by late tonight and Wednesday. The CPHC says tropical storm wind conditions are possible across portions of Hawaiʻi County on Wednesday.

    Forecasters with the CPHC say Hector is expected to continue on its current path for the next 6-12 hours or so, and then assume a due westward motion. After 48 hours, Hector is expected to begin gradually gaining latitude as it comes under increasing influence of an upper trough.

    The following are public safety measures and recommendations now in effect for the Big Island of Hawaiʻi:

    • Complete preparations before nightfall.
    • Secure loose objects in your yard and prepare your house for strong winds.
    • Boat owners should take measures to secure their vessels until the danger passes.
    • Oceanfront residents are urged to be on alert for high and dangerous surf conditions.
    • Be prepared as conditions can change rapidly!
    • More information on hurricane preparedness can be found here: http://records.hawaiicounty.gov/weblink/1/doc/88600/Page1.aspx

    Whittington, Punaluʻu, and Miloliʻi Beach Parks are closed. All pavilion and camping permits for these three parks have been cancelled through Friday.

    Intermediate 8 a.m. 8.7.18 Update:

    At 8 a.m. HST on Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2018, the eye of Hurricane Hector was located 490 miles ESE of Hilo, 580 miles ESE of Hāna, and 610 miles ESE of Kahului, Maui (near latitude 16.3 North, longitude 148.5 West).  Hector is moving toward the west near 16 mph. This general motion is expected to continue through Thursday. The center of Hector is expected to pass less than 200 miles south of the Big Island on Wednesday. The Central Pacific Hurricane Center advises the public to remember that the effects of a hurricane are far-reaching and can extend well away from the center. Maximum sustained winds are near 130 mph with higher gusts. Hector is a category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. Some weakening is forecast during the next 48 hours.  Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 30 miles from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 90 miles. The estimated minimum central pressure is 947 mb (27.97 inches).

    HAZARDS AFFECTING LAND

    SURF: Swells generated by Hector are expected to reach southeast and east facing shores of the Big Island and eastern Maui late today, likely becoming large and dangerous by late tonight and Wednesday.

    WIND: Tropical storm force winds are possible across Hawaiʻi County late tonight and Wednesday.

    PARK CLOSURES: On Hawaiʻi Island, Whittington, Punaluʻu, and Miloliʻi Beach Parks are closed. All pavilion and camping permits for these three parks have been cancelled through Friday.

    Full 5 a.m. 8.7.18 Update:

    At 5 a.m. HST on Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2018, the center of Hurricane Hector was located 540 miles ESE of Hilo, 625 miles ESE of Hāna, Maui, and 655 miles ESE of Kahului, Maui (near latitude 16.1 North, longitude 147.8 West).

    Overnight, Hector weakened considerably, but was still a category 4 hurricane (130-156 mph) as of 5 a.m., carrying 130 mph sustained winds. Some weakening is forecast during the next 48 hours, but Hector is expected to remain a major hurricane over that time.

    Hector is expected to pass roughly 165 miles south of the Big Island of Hawaiʻi on Wednesday; However, forecasters say “only a small deviation to the north of the forecast track could bring tropical storm force winds to the Big Island later tonight or on Wednesday.”  A Tropical Storm Watch remains in effect for Hawaiʻi County. That means that tropical storm conditions are possible within the watch area within 48 hours.

    Forecasters with the Central Pacific Hurricane Center say Hector is moving toward the west near 16 mph, which is expected to continue today, followed by a turn toward the west tonight through Thursday.

    Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 30 miles from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 90 miles.

    SURF: Forecasters with the Central Pacific Hurricane Center say swells generated by Hector are expected to reach southeast and east facing shores of the Big Island and eastern Maui late today and likely becoming large by late tonight and Wednesday.  Surf along east facing shores is already building and will peak later today and tonight, at 12 to 15 feet for the Big Island mainly for the Puna and Kaʻū districts with 6 to 10 feet surf for eastern Maui.

    RAIN/WIND: Tropical storm force winds are possible across Hawaiʻi County late tonight or Wednesday. Forecasters say “Enhanced rainfall from deep tropical moisture surrounding Hector will affect the Puna and Kaʻū districts of the Big Island as the hurricane passes by south of the state on Wednesday and Thursday. Rain showers may be locally heavy at times, particularly over east to southeast facing slopes.”

    The Central Pacific Hurricane Center released the following Preparedness Information:

    POTENTIAL IMPACTS

    WIND:
    Prepare for hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across the Big Island. Potential impacts in this area include:
    – Damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored mobile homes. Unsecured lightweight objects blown about.
    – Many large tree limbs broken off. A few trees snapped or uprooted, but with greater numbers in places where trees are shallow rooted. Some fences and roadway signs blown over.
    – A few roads impassable from debris, particularly within urban or heavily wooded places. Hazardous driving conditions on bridges and other elevated roadways.
    – Scattered power and communications outages.

    FLOODING RAIN:
    Prepare for locally hazardous rainfall flooding having possible limited impacts across the Puna and Kau districts of the Big Island.

    Potential impacts include:
    – Localized rainfall flooding may prompt a few evacuations.
    – Rivers and tributaries may quickly rise with swifter currents. Small streams, creeks, canals, arroyos, and ditches may become swollen and overflow in spots.
    – Flood waters can enter a few structures, especially in usually vulnerable spots. A few places where rapid ponding of water occurs at underpasses, low-lying spots, and poor drainage areas. Several storm drains and retention ponds become near-full and begin to overflow. Some brief road and bridge closures.

    OTHER COASTAL HAZARDS:
    Prepare for locally hazardous high surf with coastal impacts along
    east facing shores of the Big Island. Higher tides this week will increase the possibility of coastal inundation, due to a combination of high surf and high tides.

    PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS

    EVACUATIONS:
    Listen to local official for recommended preparedness actions, including possible evacuation. If ordered to evacuate, do so immediately.

    OTHER PREPAREDNESS INFORMATION:
    Now is the time to check your emergency plan and emergency supplies kit and take necessary actions to protect your family and secure your home or business.

    When making safety and preparedness decisions, do not focus on the exact forecast track since hazards such as flooding rain, damaging wind gusts, storm surge, and tornadoes extend well away from the center of the storm.

    Hector satellite imagery as of 8 p.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2018. PC: NOAA/CPHC

    Hector cone track for 5 p.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2018. PC: NOAA/CPHC.

    Hector wind predication for 5 p.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2018. PC: NOAA/CPHC.

    Hector satellite imagery for 5 p.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2018. PC: NOAA/CPHC.

    Hector cone track for 11 a.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2018. PC: NOAA/CPHC.

    Hector satellite imagery for 11 a.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2018. PC: NOAA/CPHC.

    Hector wind predication for 11 a.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2018. PC: NOAA/CPHC.

    Hector wind prediction for 11 a.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2018. PC: NOAA/CPHC.

    Hector satellite imagery for 11 a.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2018. PC: NOAA/CPHC.

    Wendy Osher
    Wendy Osher leads the Maui Now news team. She is also the news voice of parent company, Pacific Media Group, having served nearly 20 years as News Director for the company’s six Maui radio stations.

    View Full Bio

    ADVERTISEMENT

    Print

    Share this Article

    BREAKING NEWS 
    TEXT ALERTS
    Sign up to receive important news alerts like tsunami warnings,
    floods, traffic accidents, road closures and more.
    Phone # (xxx-xxx-xxxx):
    E-Mail:
     

      View Categories
      Promote Your Maui Business for Free Add Your Listing

      Weekly Newsletter

      ARTICLE COMMENTS ( 0 )
      This comments section is a public community forum for the purpose of free expression. Although Maui Now encourages respectful communication only, some content may be considered offensive. Please view at your own discretion.

      I Understand, Show Comments