Maui News

Nearly 200 Show up for Evening Leg of Ka’apuni in N. Kihei

February 26, 2009, 10:10 AM HST
* Updated January 5, 10:42 AM
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ADVISORIES AND PREPARATIONS: The week-long Ka’apuni procession is expected to make its way into Maalaea and over the pali throughout the course of the day. Motorists should expect to see torch bearers, marchers and slow moving escort vehicles on the route. Extra caution is advised for the safety of those on the road and on foot. Event organizers say people who want to join in should come prepared with comfortable footwear and proper clothing with high visibility. (Safety vests can be purchased from supply stores for about $4) Marchers should not expect a leisurely stroll, according to those participating in the procession. The group advises those marching after sunset to bring flashlights with fresh batteries as the light from the torches cannot light the way for a very long line of people and the roads are not always even ground.  The anticipated arrival time is 4 p.m. Friday at Moku’ula in Lahaina. The route and time line is subject to change without notice.

NEARLY 200 JOIN IN MARCH AS IT REACHES NORTH KIHEI: REACTION TO SUPREME COURT HEARING ON CEDED LANDS

Nearly 200 people joined in the week-long Ka’apuni procession as it reached North Kihei last night. Much of the energy for the day was focused on the U.S. Supreme Court hearing over ceded lands. Event participant and Hawaiian Studies instructor, Kaleikoa Kaeo, said that in lieu of the being in the court room, the procession around Maui was another way of exercising a right and identity with the lands. The procession on Maui has been placing yellow flags around the island identifying ceded lands and establishing a visual connection the claims. One of the large projects that would be affected by the outcome of the case is a state proposal to develop ceded lands mauka of the Wahikuli and Lealii areas of West Maui for additional housing.

(Story and Photo By Wendy OSHER © 2009. Images can not be used or reproduced without the expressed written consent of the Pacific Radio Group News Department.)

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KA’APUNI UPDATES FOR THURSDAY MORNING 2/26/09

  • 9/26/09 4:45 a.m.–Catching some zzz’s.
  • 9/26/09 1:45 a.m.–the procession is taking a much needed break at the Kihei Youth Center. There, they are being treated to food, music and rest.
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KA’APUNI UPDATES FOR WEDNESDAY EVENING 2/25/09

  • 9/25/09 9:45, the procession is within a block of the Kihei Youth center.
  • 9/25/09 8:47 p.m. Passed Lipoa
  • 9/25/09 7:15 p.m. left Kamaole

KA’APUNI UPDATE FOR 9:00 A.M. 2/26/09 THURSDAY: DAY SIX

The week-long Ka’apuni procession for unity and enlightenment in the Native Hawaiian community, is a day away from completing a 193-mile round-trip trek to Moku’ula in West Maui. Members of the procession remain at the Kihei Youth Center this morning resting up before making their way into Maalaea and over the pali throughout the course of the day.

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PHOTOS: NEARLY 200 SHOW UP FOR EVENING LEG OF KA’APUNI IN N. KIHEI

(Photos By Wendy OSHER © 2009. I mages on this site are the property of the “Ka’apuni” and can not be used or reproduced without the expressed written consent of the Pacific Radio Group/MauiNOW.com  News Department.)

(Caption: Left: Uncle Leslie Kululoio carries a kerosene lamp that holds part of the flame being carried around the island. Middle: James Sagawinit carries one of the torches Wednesday night as the procession gathers for the next leg of the journey at the Kihei Youth Center. Right: One of the members of the Kapu ‘ohana works to maintain the torches to assure they stay lit throughout the 193-mile circuit.)

(Photos: Left: Hawaiian Studies instructor, Kaleikoa Kaeo sounds a pu’ohe bamboo trumpet as he walks with the procession towards the Kihei Youth Center; Right: Uncle Leslie Kululoio (foreground) and Richard Ho’opi’i (background) stand together as the kupuna (elders) explain the significance of the journey and the lessons that can be passed on to future generations.)

(Caption: Left: Winds blowing through the South Maui area Wednesday night kept members of the torch crew on alert and ready to assist. Their job is to assure the light lasts the entire length of the week-long journey. Middle: Marchers refuel at the Kihei Youth Center after the latest leg of the Ka’apuni that stretched from Maluaka Beach in Wailea to the Youth Center in North Kihei. Right: Ramsey & Leimomi Ho’opi’i were seen at Kahakuloa, Wahinepe’e, Kipahulu and now in Kihei.

(Photos: Some marchers have been revisiting the Ka’apuni march at different points along the route, jumping in line as their work and home schedules permit. About a dozen have been with the procession since it began six days ago at Moku’ula including event organizer Ke’eaumoku Kapu who walked the first 40 miles non-stop before taking a rest break.)

(Photo captions: The rest break at the Kihei Youth Center was a time to rest and recoup for long walk that is expected to take the procession over the pali and into the next district of their journey today. Workers from Hui No Ke Ola Pono also offered lomi lomi massage to walkers in theKa’apuni procession.)

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