Hospice Maui Moves Forward With Plans for Expanded Service

August 27, 2014, 2:11 PM HST · Updated August 28, 11:14 PM
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Carrie Anne Campos, Hospice Maui’s Office Manager and granddaughter of Hospice Patient celebrates generosity of the Maui Community. Courtesy photo.

Carrie Anne Campos, Hospice Maui’s Office Manager and granddaughter of Hospice Patient celebrates generosity of the Maui Community. Courtesy photo.

By Wendy Osher

Hospice Maui is proposing the development of a five-bedroom care facility adjacent to its existing offices on Mahalani Street.

The plans are aimed at expanding services to include in-patient care for those who require full-time attention.

The non-profit organization filed a Final Environmental Assessment this week with a finding of no significant impact.

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Plans call for the construction of a 4,500 square foot facility to be named Hale Hoʻoluʻolu, at 400 Mahalani Street in Wailuku.

The nearly 4-acre project site is located near the intersection of Mahalani Street and Maui Lani Parkway.

Hospice Maui has provided services on the island for the past 30 years in support of patients and their families who seek care and support during their final stages of life.

Organization officials say that since 1981, Hospice Maui has been the sole provider of hospice care on the island, serving an estimated 330 patients and more than 1,300 patient family members and caregivers over a 12 month period.

Currently, the organization can only provide hospice care to those who have a residence, can be made comfortable at home, and have caregiving in place, the FEA states.

According to the assessment of need portion of the document, it is estimated that those who choose hospitalization may spend about $1,500 per day without diagnostic procedures, interventions, or medications.

Hospice Maui anticipates that full hospice care in the proposed facility with room and board would cost less than a third of the cost associated with hospitalization.

“A hospice care facility on Maui would increase access to appropriate end-of-life care, as well as conserve resources that could be better used otherwise,” organization representatives said in the document.

According to the final environmental assessment, construction is slated to take nine months to complete and is proposed to commence upon receipt of necessary regulatory permits and approvals.

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