Interisland Digital Microwave Network Complete, Fully Operational

October 22, 2015, 3:32 PM HST · Updated October 22, 4:25 PM
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The Koko Head radio site, located on Oʻahu, is one of 15 tower sites that comprise the Anuenue digital microwave system throughout the Hawaiian Islands. Anuenue is a collaborative partnership with the U.S. Coast Guard and state of Hawaii that replaced the aging analog microwave with a digital data transport system to support official emergency communications requirements for state and federal agencies. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Melissa E. McKenzie/Released)

The Koko Head radio site, located on Oʻahu, is one of 15 tower sites that comprise the Anuenue digital microwave system throughout the Hawaiian Islands. Anuenue is a collaborative partnership with the U.S. Coast Guard and state of Hawaii that replaced the aging analog microwave with a digital data transport system to support official emergency communications requirements for state and federal agencies. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Melissa E. McKenzie/Released)

State and US Coast Guard officials today celebrated the now fully operational ANUENUE Interisland Digital Microwave Network.

The system consists of high-capacity microwave links, radio towers, and facility buildings that interconnect and support the systems and networks relied upon by first responders, search and rescue, law enforcement, emergency services, and critical government operations.

Twelve ANUENUE “high sites” located on mountain tops — many at remote locations — connect with eight sites located at state office buildings and USCG properties.

State officials say the completion of this joint project has been many years in the making and features a partnership that shares resources and capabilities to achieve a common goal of protecting and serving the people of Hawai‘i.

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Department and administrative leaders gathered today in the Governor’s Executive Chambers to celebrate the completion of the project.

Haleakalā tower, located on Maui, is one of 15 tower sites that comprise the Anuenue digital microwave system throughout the Hawaiian chain. Anuenue is a collaborative partnership with the US Coast Guard and state of Hawaiʻi that replaced the aging analog microwave with a digital data transport system that supports official emergency communications requirements for state and federal agencies. (US Coast Guard courtesy photo/Released)

Haleakalā tower, located on Maui, is one of 15 tower sites that comprise the Anuenue digital microwave system throughout the Hawaiian chain. Anuenue is a collaborative partnership with the US Coast Guard and state of Hawaiʻi that replaced the aging analog microwave with a digital data transport system that supports official emergency communications requirements for state and federal agencies. (US Coast Guard courtesy photo/Released)

“A shared vision and trust between the State of Hawai‘i and the Coast Guard resulted in a partnership that shares resources and capabilities to achieve a common goal of protecting and serving the people of Hawai‘i,” said Gov. David Ige in a press release statement. “As a result, Hawai‘i is more secure and better prepared for emergencies.”

“The ANUENUE Network is a testimony to the superb relationship between the US Coast Guard and the State of Hawai‘i,” said Capt. James Jenkins, Coast Guard 14th District Chief of Staff. “This vital system enhances the effectiveness and resiliency of communications among the entire first responder team during both routine operations and for emergent threats such as hurricanes and other natural disasters.”

State officials say the ANUENUE network was designed to survive disasters, natural or otherwise. Its towers and buildings are “designed to survive the 155 mph winds of a Category 4 hurricane, generators are ready to run for a week without commercial power and earthquake Zone 4-rated backbone facilities are located away from tsunami inundation zones.”

Backbone towers range in size from 50 to 180 feet tall and support microwave dish antennas as large as 15 feet in diameter. The microwave radio backbone provides a secure 155-Mbit/s SONET connection across the state.

ANUENUE replaced the Rainbow Microwave System, a system that state officials say had a technologically outdated predecessor that initiated the concept of shared communications infrastructure and fostered the cooperation and resource sharing critical to the current success.

State support of the ANUENUE started with an initial appropriation by the legislature in 2001 for radio site construction. The state’s total $19.1 million investment in ANUENUE facilities and equipment was significantly extended by the USCG contribution to the partnership. The cooperation of county agencies, private land owners and other federal agencies, especially the Federal Aviation Administration, also helped move the project forward, according to state officials.

State users of the ANUENUE include the Statewide Shared Blended land mobile radio system; Maritime Wireless Network System; Hawai‘i Emergency Management Agency; and the Departments of Public Safety, Transportation, Health, and Land and Natural Resources. State sponsored users include the County of Maui Police Department and other agencies of all counties.

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