Maui News

11 Fatalities in Twin Engine Plane Crash at Dillingham

June 21, 2019, 7:15 PM HST
* Updated June 22, 10:00 AM
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By Wendy Osher

Update: (9:56 a.m. 6.22.19)

Officials with the state Department of Transportation this morning issued new information saying authorities have confirmed there were 11 people on board the plane that went down soon after takeoff from Dillingham Airfield with no survivors. Federal inspectors continue to investigate the cause of the crash that occurred June 21, 2019. Previous reports indicated that there were nine people onboard with no survivors.

Update: (6:20 a.m. 6.22.19)

Nine people died in a twin-engine plane crash at the Dillingham Airfield on Oʻahu’s North Shore on Friday evening, according to state Transportation officials.

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Authorities with the FAA tell Maui Now that preliminary information indicates the plane was a twin-engine Beechcraft BE65 King Air craft that crashed under unknown circumstances while taking off.

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Authorities say the aircraft, which was carrying skydivers, was destroyed by fire. There were nine people on board.

Two FAA inspectors were at the crash site Friday evening. Both the FAA and NTSB will investigate, with the NTSB to be the lead agency.

It typically takes the NTSB a year or more to determine a probable cause of an accident.

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The identity of the victims is pending release.

Update: (7:25 p.m. 6.21.19)

Nine people have died in a twin engine plane crash at Dillingham Airfield.

The state Department of Transportation issued the following update at 7:25 p.m. on Friday, June 21, 2019.

“With extreme sadness HDOT reports there were nine souls on board the King Air twin engine plane that went down near Dillingham Airfield with no apparent survivors.”

Previous post: (As of 7:04 p.m. 6.21.19)

A twin engine aircraft has gone down near Dillingham Airfield with six fatalities being reported by first responders, according to state Transportation officials.

This is a developing story. More information to follow.

Check back for updates, which will be posted as they become available.

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