Maui News

PBS Hawaiʻi to Air Maui-Made Documentary About Haleakalā

May 13, 2015, 4:21 PM HST
* Updated May 14, 8:52 AM
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Haleakalā / Image: Jack Dugan

By Maui Now Staff

PBS Hawaiʻi will air the Maui-made documentary “The Quietest Place on Earth” by Emmy Award-winning filmmaker Dr. Tom Vendetti on Thursday, May 14, 2015 at 9 p.m.

Vendetti and co-producers Robert C. Stone and Rick Chatenever filmed “The Quietest Place on Earth” to introduce Haleakalā as Maui’s geological and spiritual birthplace to a world audience.

According to a PBS Hawaiʻi announcement, the concept came following research by environmental sound and recording engineer Gordon Hempton, which found the crater of Haleakalā on Maui to be the quietest place on Earth.

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The “Quietest Place on Earth” tells the story of Haleakalā from the perspective of local Hawaiian cultural practitioners, artists, scientists, authors, musicians, cowboys and spiritual leaders.

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According to the announcement, the film brings the “character” of Haleakalā to the forefront, working to dispel misconceptions and convey a deep awareness of core beliefs in Hawaiian culture.

Cultural specialist Clifford Naeʻole and musical artist Keola Beamer introduce Haleakalā’s preeminent place in Hawaiian mythology, in the day-to-day lives of Hawaiians throughout history, and how today, the crater’s silence offers an alternative to the frenzy of modern life.

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