Haleakala National Park sends Maui aide to the Gulf Coast

July 23, 2010, 9:38 AM HST · Updated July 23, 9:38 AM
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Four employees from Haleakala National Park were among the crews recruited to assist with the oil cleanup efforts in the Gulf Coast.  National Park Service Director, Jonathan Jarvis, issued a memorandum on June 21, 2010 asking Parks throughout the nation “to make personnel available throughout this critical period.”  Jarvis asked for personnel with the appropriate skills to participate when requested and be granted the necessary supervisory approval.” The personnel are tasked with accompanying clean-up crews in protecting sensitive resources including bird nesting areas and cultural resource sites.

Peter Fitzpatrick, a Biological Science Technician for Haleakala’s Endangered Wildlife Management program, worked for four weeks as a Resource Advisor, assisting with efforts at Gulf Islands National Seashore in Florida.

Four employees from Haleakala National Park were among the crews recruited to assist with the oil cleanup efforts in the Gulf Coast.

Peter Fitzpatrick, a Biological Science Technician for Haleakala’s Endangered Wildlife Management program, worked for four weeks as a Resource Advisor, assisting with efforts at Gulf Islands National Seashore in Florida. “We worked days and nights and got very little sleep,” said Fitzpatrick.  “It was hard work, but it was a great experience and I’m glad I could be there to help,” he said. 

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Danielle Fujii-Doe and Steve Orwig were deployed shortly after Fitzpatrick’s return.  Fujii-Doe and Orwig left on July 10, 2010 for 30 days and are working in Alabama and Florida.  Orwig, a Baldwin High School graduate, is a Biological Science Technician with the Vegetation Management program. Fujii-Doe, a graduate of King Kekaulike High School, is a Biological Science Technician with the Endangered Wildlife Management program at Haleakala.  Fujii-Doe said that she is working as a Resource Advisor at Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge in Alabama and Gulf Islands National Seashore in the pan handle of Florida.

Timmy Paulokaleioku Bailey was called for special assignment to the Gulf.  As the Nation’s only ACETA (Aerial Capture Eradication and Tagging of Animals) instructor for the Department of Interior, Bailey’s services were requested.  Biologists wanted to utilize ACETA’s tool of launching a net from a helicopter to capture oiled birds that cannot fly.  Bailey, a Native Hawaiian and life-long Kula resident,  spent a week in New Orleans, Louisiana, check-riding and certifying pilots and gunners.  “The biologists in that area of the US never had ACETA as a tool,” said Bailey.  “The Park Service has given me a lot of opportunities and I was glad that this was one of them,” he said.

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