Hurricane Tracker

Hector Remains Strong Category 4 Hurricane, Tropical Storm Watch for Hawaii County

August 6, 2018, 1:02 AM HST
* Updated August 6, 11:43 PM
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Hurricane track as of 11 p.m. on Monday, Aug. 6, 2018. PC: CPHC/NOAA.

Update: 11 p.m. 8.6.18

There was some slight weakening in the latest forecast and a slight movement in the track away from the islands. Hector is expected to pass roughly 165 miles south of the Big Island of Hawaiʻi on Wednesday. At 11 p.m. HST on Monday, Aug. 6, 2018, the center of Hurricane Hector was located 635 miles ESE of Hilo and 755 miles ESE of Kahului.

Below is the latest Update form the Central Pacific Hurricane Center:

At 11 p.m. HST on Monday, Aug. 6, 2018, the center of Hurricane Hector was located near latitude 15.8 North, longitude 146.3 West. Hector is moving toward the west near 16 mph. This motion is expected to continue through Tuesday, followed by a turn toward the west Tuesday night through Thursday. On the forecast track, Hector is expected to pass roughly 165 miles south of the Big Island of Hawaii on Wednesday.

Maximum sustained winds are near 145 mph with higher gusts. Hector is a category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. Some weakening is forecast during the next 48 hours, but Hector is expected to remain a major hurricane.

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Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 35 miles from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 105 miles.

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The estimated minimum central pressure is 938 mb (27.70 inches).

HAZARDS AFFECTING LAND

SURF: Swells generated by Hector are expected to reach southeast and east facing shores of the Big Island and eastern Maui late Tuesday and likely becoming large by late Tuesday night and Wednesday.

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WIND: Tropical storm force winds are possible across Hawaii County late Tuesday night or Wednesday.

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Update: 8 p.m. 8.6.18

Hector remains a strong Category 4 Hurricane with 155 mph sustained winds and continues to move on a westward path across the Central Pacific. A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for the Big Island of Hawaiʻi.

At 8 p.m. HST on Monday, Aug. 6, 2018, the center of Hurricane Hector was located about 680 miles ESE of Hilo and 890 miles ESE of Honolulu (15.8N 145.6W). The system is currently moving on a WNW path at 16 mph.

Hurricane Hector is expected to pass approximately 150 miles south of the Big Island on Wednesday; However, CPHC forecasters say only a small deviation to the north of the forecast track could bring tropical storm force winds to the Big Island late Tuesday night or Wednesday.

Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 35 miles from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 105 miles.

SURF: Swells generated by Hector are expected to reach southeast and east facing shores of the Big Island and eastern Maui during the next day, likely becoming large by late Tuesday and Wednesday. Surf along east facing shores is already building, and is expected to peak at 15 to 20 feet, mainly for the Puna and Kaʻū districts of the Big Island, late Tuesday or Wednesday.

RAIN: Peripheral rainfall from Hector may affect portions of the Big Island as Hector passes south and southwest of the state. The rainfall may be locally heavy at times, particularly on east or southeast facing slopes.

WIND: Tropical storm force winds are possible across Hawaiʻi County late Tuesday night or Wednesday.

The Central Pacific Hurricane Center Released the following advisories:

POTENTIAL IMPACTS

* WIND:

Prepare for hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across the Big Island. Potential impacts include:
– Damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored mobile homes. Unsecured lightweight objects blown about.
– Many large tree limbs broken off. A few trees snapped or uprooted, but with greater numbers in places where trees are shallow rooted. Some fences and roadway signs blown over.
– A few roads impassable from debris, particularly within urban or heavily wooded places. Hazardous driving conditions on bridges and other elevated roadways.
– Scattered power and communications outages.

* FLOODING RAIN:

Prepare for locally hazardous rainfall flooding having possible limited impacts across the Kau and Puna districts of the Big Island.
Potential impacts include:
– Localized rainfall flooding may prompt a few evacuations.
– Rivers and tributaries may quickly rise with swifter currents. Small streams, creeks, canals, arroyos, and ditches may become swollen and overflow in spots.
– Flood waters can enter a few structures, especially in usually vulnerable spots. A few places where rapid ponding of water occurs at underpasses, low-lying spots, and poor drainage areas. Several storm drains and retention ponds become near-full and begin to overflow. Some brief road and bridge closures.

Elsewhere across the rest of the Hawaiian Islands, little to no impact is anticipated.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS

* EVACUATIONS:

WATCH/WARNING PHASE – Listen to local official for recommended preparedness actions, including possible evacuation. If ordered to evacuate, do so immediately.

* OTHER PREPAREDNESS INFORMATION:
Now is the time to check your emergency plan and emergency supplies kit and take necessary actions to protect your family and secure your home or business.

When making safety and preparedness decisions, do not focus on the exact forecast track since hazards such as flooding rain, damaging wind gusts, storm surge, and tornadoes extend well away from the center of the storm.

Update: 5 p.m. 8.6.18

Not much has changed with Hector’s strength and track since the last update. Hector remains a strong Category 4 hurricane with 155 mph winds. Aside from a slight adjustment to the north, little change was made to the track forecast.

At 5 p.m. HST on Monday, Aug. 6, 2018, the center of Hurricane Hector was located 735 miles ESE of Hilo and 850 miles ESE of Kahului (15.7 North, longitude 144.7 West). Hector is moving toward the WNW near 16 mph. This motion is expected to continue tonight, followed by a turn toward the west on Tuesday and Wednesday.

Hector is expected to pass roughly 150 miles south of the Big Island of Hawaiʻi on Wednesday.

Some weakening is forecast during the next 48 hours, though Hector is expected to remain a major hurricane.

Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 35 miles from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 105 miles .

The estimated minimum central pressure is 936 mb (27.64 inches).

SURF: Swells generated by Hector are expected to reach southeast and east facing shores of the Big Island and eastern Maui during the next day, likely becoming large by late Tuesday and Wednesday.

WIND: Tropical storm force winds are possible across Hawaii County on Wednesday.

According to the CPHC, Hurricane Hunter aircraft from the US Air Force 53rd Weather Reconnaissance Squadron embarked on their first mission into Hector and found the system to be stronger than anticipated with Hector classified as a strong category four hurricane. The mission was cut short due to mechanical concerns. The next mission into Hector will be tonight.

Forecasters with the Central Pacific Hurricane Center say, “While the official forecast track continues to lie to the south of the Hawaiian islands, only a slight deviation to the north of the forecast track would significantly increase potential impacts to the State of Hawaii. This necessitates a Hurricane Watch for Hawaii County.”

Authorities advise that now is a good time for everyone in the Hawaiian Islands to ensure that they have their hurricane plan in place.

Forecasters with the National Weather Service say “Hector will cross into the local region from Tuesday night into Thursday. Any impacts from Hector will be highly dependent on its track and intensity. Hector will exit the region by Friday, with typical summertime trade wind weather pattern expected on into the weekend.”

Emergency managers on Hawaiʻi Island say Whittington, Punaluʻu, and Miloliʻi Beach Parks will be closed after tonight. All pavilion and camping permits for TuesdayFriday are cancelled.

Update: 11 a.m. 8.6.18

A Tropical Storm Watch has been issued for Hawaiʻi County, meaning damaging winds and surf, as well as flooding rains are possible within the next 48 hours.  Locations elsewhere in the Hawaiian Islands should monitor the progress of Hurricane Hector.

At 11 a.m. HST on Monday, Aug. 6, 2018, the center of Hurricane Hector was located 845 miles ESE of Hilo and 960 miles ESE of Kahului (near latitude 15.2 North, longitude 143.1 West). Hector is expected to pass roughly 150 miles south of the Big Island of Hawaiʻi on Wednesday.

Maximum sustained winds have increased to 155 mph with higher gusts, making Hector a strong Category 4 Hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Scale. Some weakening is forecast during the next 48 hours.

Emergency managers say high surf is expected to impact east-facing shores of Hawaiʻi Island and East Maui, with heights building today through Tuesday and peaking Tuesday night into Wednesday. Surf may reach 15 to 20 feet.

Forecasters with the Central Pacific Hurricane Center say Hector is moving toward the west near 16 mph. This general motion is expected to continue for the next couple of days.

Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 35 miles from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 105 miles. The estimated minimum central pressure is 936 mb (27.64 inches).

According to the CPHC, Hurricane Hunter aircraft from the US Air Force 53rd Weather Reconnaissance Squadron embarked on their first mission into Hector and found the system to be stronger than anticipated with Hector classified as a strong category four hurricane. The mission was cut short due to mechanical concerns. The next mission into Hector will be tonight.

Forecasters with the Central Pacific Hurricane Center say, “While the official forecast track continues to lie to the south of the Hawaiian islands, only a slight deviation to the north of the forecast track would significantly increase potential impacts to the State of Hawaii. This necessitates a Hurricane Watch for Hawaii County.”

Authorities advise that now is a good time for everyone in the Hawaiian Islands to ensure that they have their hurricane plan in place.

Forecasters with the National Weather Service say “Hector will cross into the local region from Tuesday night into Thursday. Any impacts from Hector will be highly dependent on its track and intensity. Hector will exit the region by Friday, with typical summertime trade wind weather pattern expected on into the weekend.”

Emergency managers on Hawaiʻi Island say Whittington, Punaluʻu, and Miloliʻi Beach Parks will be closed after tonight. All pavilion and camping permits for TuesdayFriday are cancelled.

Update: 5 a.m. 8.6.18

At 5 a.m. HST on Monday, Aug. 6, 2018, the center of Hurricane Hector was located 925 miles ESE of Hilo and 1040 miles ESE of Kahului, Maui (near latitude 15.0 North, longitude 141.9 West).

Hector is moving toward the west near 15 mph.  A motion toward the WNW at an increased forward speed is expected through Tuesday, followed by a westward motion Tuesday night through Friday, according to the Central Pacific Hurricane Center.

Maximum sustained winds are near 145 mph with higher gusts.  Hector is a category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. Gradual weakening is forecast during the next few days.

Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 30 miles (45 km) from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 100 miles.

The estimated minimum central pressure is 941 mb (27.79 inches).

Update: 11 p.m. 8.5.18

Hector has entered the Central Pacific as a Category 4 Hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale, with increased forward movement near 15 mph and maximum sustained winds are near 140 mph.  CPHC forecasters also note a well defined eye surrounded by a large ring of cloud tops.

At 11 p.m. HST on Sunday, Aug. 5, 2018, the center of Hurricane Hector was located 1010 miles ESE of Hilo and 1120 miles ESE of Kahului, Maui (near latitude 14.9 North, longitude 140.6 West.

The Central Pacific Hurricane Center forecasts that Hector will continue to travel toward the WNW at an increased forward speed through Tuesday, followed by a westward motion Tuesday night through Friday.

Some fluctuations in intensity are expected overnight into Monday, followed by gradual weakening Monday night through Wednesday.

Forecasters say Hector will remain in favorable low shear environment through the forecast period, “but there are some factors that should lead to gradual weakening beyond 24 hours,” including marginal sea surface temperatures around 80.6F for the next few days and “very dry mid-level air will begin to surround the storm Monday night, and this is expected to lead to gradual weakening of the system from Monday night through Wednesday.”

Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 35 miles from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 105 miles. The estimated minimum central pressure is 947 mb (27.97 inches).

Hurricane track as of 11 p.m. on Monday, Aug. 6, 2018. PC: CPHC/NOAA.

Hurricane track as of 11 p.m. on Monday, Aug. 6, 2018. PC: CPHC/NOAA.

Hector satellite imagery for 11 p.m. on Monday, Aug. 6, 2018. PC: NOAA/CPHC.

Hurricane Hector Hurricane Force Wind Probabilities as of 11 p.m. on Monday, Aug. 6, 2018. PC: CPHC/NOAA

Hector satellite imagery for 8 p.m. on Monday, Aug. 6, 2018. PC: NOAA/CPHC.

Hurricane track as of 5 p.m. on Monday, Aug. 6, 2018. PC: CPHC/NOAA.

Hurricane track as of 5 p.m. on Monday, Aug. 6, 2018. PC: CPHC/NOAA.

Hector satellite imagery for 5 p.m. on Monday, Aug. 6, 2018. PC: NOAA/CPHC.

Hurricane Hector Hurricane Force Wind Probabilities as of 5 p.m. on Monday, Aug. 6, 2018. PC: CPHC/NOAA

Hector forecast cone for 11 a.m. on Monday, Aug. 6, 2018. PC: NOAA/CPHC.

Hector satellite imagery for 11 a.m. on Monday, Aug. 6, 2018. PC: NOAA/CPHC.

Hurricane Hector Hurricane Force Wind Probabilities as of 11 a.m. on Monday, Aug. 6, 2018. PC: CPHC/NOAA

Hurricane Hector updated satellite imagery as of 11 a.m. on Monday, Aug. 6, 2018. PC: CPHC/NOAA

Hurricane Hector updated sea surface temperature analysis as of 11 a.m. on Monday, Aug. 6, 2018. PC: CPHC/NOAA

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